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Monday, October 5, 2020 | History

2 edition of Decay in white fir top-killed by Douglas-fir tussock moth found in the catalog.

Decay in white fir top-killed by Douglas-fir tussock moth

Wickman, Boyd E.

Decay in white fir top-killed by Douglas-fir tussock moth

by Wickman, Boyd E.

  • 308 Want to read
  • 18 Currently reading

Published by Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture in Portland, Or .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Abies concolor -- Diseases and pests.,
  • Douglas-fir tussock moth.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementBoyd E. Wickman, Robert F. Scharpf.
    SeriesUSDA Forest Service research paper PNW -- 133.
    ContributionsScharpf, Robert F., 1931-
    The Physical Object
    Pagination9 p. :
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL18160505M

      The Douglas-fir tussock moth caterpillars recently left several campers in the Sage Hen recreation area with allergic reactions and skin irritation. Author: Shirah Matsuzawa Published: . The Douglas-fir tussock moth, O. pseudotsugata, feeds primarily on Douglas-fir and true firs. Lighter-colored tufts of hair along the back, red spots on top, and an orange stripe along each side distinguish its mature larvae from those of the rusty tussock moth. Life cycle. Tussock moths overwinter as eggs.

    Web Search Engines for Articles on "Douglas-fir Tussock Moth" WorldCat; Google Scholar; Google Books; ; Additional Sources of Information Related to "Insects" Alberta Lepidopterists' Guild Bees - Discover Life Bumble Bee Species Accounts at Montana Entomology Collection Bumble Bee Watch. Franco). These tussock moth infestations are the first documented outbreaks in Utah (Ollieu , Tunnock ct aI. ). Previous tussock moth outbreaks indicate three primary hosts depending on location. In British Columbia and northern Washington, Douglas-firis preferred; in southern Washing­ ton, Oregon, and Idaho, Douglas-fir, white fir.

      Heavy localized populations of white-marked tussock moth caterpillars are being reported in central and western Ohio. Curtis Young (OSU Extension, Van Wert County) showed images during this week's BYGL Zoom Inservice of caterpillars on a variety of hosts including rose and noted he had received reports of hot spots in Allen, Hancock, and Putnam Counties. () which show little infection in white fir top killed by Douglas-fir tussock moth some 35 years earlier. These workers suggest two possible reasons for the limited amount of decay found in their studies: 1. Climate limiting infection and rate of decay. 2. Absence of suitable substrate (heartwood) in .


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Decay in white fir top-killed by Douglas-fir tussock moth by Wickman, Boyd E. Download PDF EPUB FB2

Stands heavily defoliated in by the Douglas-fir tussock moth, Hemerocampa pseudotsugata McD., at Mammoth Lakes, California, were studied to determine the incidence and extent of decay in top-damaged trees.

This was done by dissecting the tops of trees felled during by: 1. Books to Borrow. Top American Libraries Canadian Libraries Universal Library Community Texts Project Gutenberg Biodiversity Heritage Library Children's Library.

Open Library. Featured movies All video latest This Just In Prelinger Archives Democracy Now. Occupy Wall Street TV NSA Clip Library. Get this from a library. Decay in white fir top-killed by Douglas-fir tussock moth.

[Boyd E Wickman; Robert F Scharpf; Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station (Portland, Or.)]. Follow Boyd E. Wickman and explore their bibliography from 's Boyd E.

Wickman Author Page. Orgyia pseudotsugata, the Douglas-fir tussock moth, is a moth of the subfamily Lymantriinae first described by James Halliday McDunnough in It is found in western North America.

Its population periodically irrupts in cyclical caterpillars feed on the needles of Douglas fir, true fir, and spruce in summer, and moths are on the wing from July or August to November.

Hardcover Decay in White Fir Top-Killed by Douglas-Fir Tussock Moth (Classic Reprint). The White-marked Tussock Moth caterpillar is covered with them and the chemicals that are transferred onto skin when they are touched can cause an allergic reaction in humans resulting in redness, irritation, and welts.

Pruritic dermatitis (itching) is commonly seen in small children who come into contact with it, or its cocoon, on the. Key Wildlife Value: The Douglas-fir tussock moth creates snags and down wood by severely defoliating and causing the death of all sizes of true fir and Douglas-fir trees.

It also interacts with other disturbance agents, especially bark beetles, to cause host tree mortality. The Lymantriinae (formerly called the Lymantriidae) are a subfamily of moths of the family taxon was erected by George Hampson in Many of its component species are referred to as "tussock moths" of one sort or another.

The caterpillar, or larval, stage of these species often has a distinctive appearance of alternating bristles and haired projections. A rusty red color covers the tips of trees in the hills of Missoula.

Forester John Ottman says the Douglas-fir tussock moth is responsible. Ottman says he doesn’t know how it got there, but. Douglas-fir, white fir, and grand fir are all equally acceptable. In the south (California, Nevada, Arizona, and Figure 1. -- Distrubution of host type where Douglas-fir tussock moth may be found and location of outbreaks.

trees, brush, and buildings, but once an outbreak subsides, finding caterpil-lars is difficult. Defoliation by the tussock moth. Douglas fir tussock moths are native to western Montana but tend to be found only in certain areas, including Missoula, Kalispell, Columbia Falls and around Flathead Lake.

The reason they’re limited is female moths can’t fly. The males must search them out. That’s a good thing, because their offspring are voracious. Decay in white fir top-killed by Douglas-fir tussock moth by Wickman, Boyd E comment 0.

Cover title Topics: Abies concolor Diseases and pests, Douglas-fir tussock moth. U.S. Forest Service Pacific Northwest Region. 71 Early effects of forest fire on streamflow characteristics Estimating decay in toyear-old Grand fir.

felled during logging. Comparisons were made with white fir in a nearby logged area that was not defoliated during the old outbreak. Few decay organisms were isolated from trees top-killed by Douglas- fir tussock moth. However, old top damage and a condition known as wetwood were common in the infested area.

Wetwood was found. Related: Douglas-fir tussock moth affects nea acres of fir trees in the Packer John State Forest. We talked to some huckleberry pickers who were aware of the tussock moth. The caterpillar of the Douglas-Fir Tussock Moth (Orgyia pseudotsugata) feeds on firs, spruce, Douglas-firs, and other evergreens of the western United States and are a major cause of their defoliation.

Young caterpillars feed exclusively on new growth. These include the larvae of tussock moths, fall webworms (more populations arrive in summer/fall) and tent caterpillars. Yes, the tussock moth larvae can sting.

Lifestyle. Spraying against tussock moths works, but it’s hard to know if and when to start. The recent Douglas-fir tussock moth outbreak in Methow Valley forests did less damage than expected, according to Forest Service entomologist Connie Mehmel.

The progression of the outbreak highlighted the difficulties in determining when it’s appropriate to spray. In a study of decay losses associated with tops killed by Douglas-fir tussock moth (Orgyia pseudotsugata McDonnough) defoliation, little deductible defect was associated with top-kill of white fir in California after 33 years (Wickman and Scharpf ).

In in eastern Oregon and Washington, Aho and others found. The Douglas Fir tussock moth is a common pest in Colorado. The Tussock moth caterpillar (Orgyia psuedotsugata) eat the needles of spruce, Douglas fir, and true fir trees.

These caterpillars cause defoliation, which occurs rapidly from the top of the tree down. Tree tops can often be completely destroyed after a single season. Surviving stands are invariably in a weakened state, and very susceptible to other insects (such as the Douglas-Fir Beetle) and onally, about 20% of people and animals are allergic to Douglas-Fir Tussock Moth hairs.

These hairs are present on the larvae, the cast larval skins, the egg masses, the cocoons, and the female moth.Tussockosis: reactions to Douglas fir tussock moth. Perlman F, Press E, Googins JA, Malley A, Poarea H.

An unusually heavy infestation of the tussock moth resulted in a high incidence of symptoms affecting the skin and mucous membranes of those exposed to high concentrations of .Tussock moth, (family Lymantriidae), any of a group of moths (order Lepidoptera), the common name for which is derived from the hair tufts, or tussocks, found on most larval family, which occurs in both Eurasia and the New World, includes several species that are destructive to shade and forest trees: the gypsy moth (q.v.; Lymantria dispar), browntail moth (Nygmia phaeorrhoea), satin.